Senator Lindsey Graham (2nd R), R-SC, stands with Senator Bill Cassidy (L), R-LA, Senator Dean Heller (2nd L), R-NV, and Senator Ron Johnson (R), R-WI, to announce their legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare through block grants on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on September 13, 2017.

Jim Watson | AFP | Getty Images

Senator Lindsey Graham (2nd R), R-SC, stands with Senator Bill Cassidy (L), R-LA, Senator Dean Heller (2nd L), R-NV, and Senator Ron Johnson (R), R-WI, to announce their legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare through block grants on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on September 13, 2017.

In addition, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office will not have the time to estimate the plan’s effects on insurance coverage and premiums before the Senate would vote on it.

If three Republican senators oppose the plan, it will fail. Multiple attempts to repeal Obamacare already failed in the Senate earlier this year amid GOP opposition.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has repeatedly stated he will not support the plan. He says he wants a bill that goes further to repeal Obamacare.

Trump lambasted Paul on Twitter over his opposition.

On Wednesday, Paul tweeted that he is “currently working with the president to finalize” a “better replacement with cross state purchase of inexpensive insurance.”

Focus has turned to Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, and John McCain, R-Ariz., who voted against the last GOP attempt to overhaul the health-care system. While Collins has suggested she has problems with the Cassidy-Graham plan, neither Murkowski nor McCain have given a clear sense of where they stand. McCain, a friend of Graham, cast the vote that killed the previous repeal attempt.

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